Bluebottles, divorce & other ramblings

FeaturedBluebottles, divorce & other ramblings

I’ve neglected my blog and WordPress for the last few weeks. Life got really busy – as I’m sure you can all appreciate – and then the mad preparations for the festive season followed by the need for us to transform ourselves into the ‘new us for the new year’.

Christmas was wonderful and exhausting at the same time; the offspring and their partners came to stay. We entertained every day either with friends at home or out on the town. The cocktail shaker was dusted off and the espresso martinis were free-flowing together with the Aperol spritzes. Nothing gave me greater pleasure than having our house full of family – just like it used to be – the long hair blocking the sink, the makeup strewn around the bathroom, the endless piles of washing, the phone and laptop chargers snaking from every available wall socket, the stacks of sunglasses and heaps of swimming towels – it was brilliant! And the laughter, oh! the glorious laughter.

We traveled a couple of hours north to our favourite spot on the Sunshine Coast for a day on the beach. Chief was stung on the foot by a Bluebottle jellyfish while walking along the shoreline. By the time we were home, the story had morphed into “I was swimming a mile out and was bitten by a shark!”

Over the last few weeks, there has been an invasion of Bluebottle jellyfish, with thousands being blown to the shores of Queensland beaches. Last weekend alone, there were over 2,500 beachgoers treated for stings. The little critters wrap their tentacles around limbs and release their sting which I’m told is very painful. Fortunately, the surf lifesavers were on hand with bags of ice and advice. We’ll probably be giving the beach a miss for a couple of weeks.

Bluebottle (Portuguese Man ‘o War)

And then on the 2nd January, the house fell silent. The offspring headed back to Adelaide and Chief and me back to work. The tree has been ‘undecorated’ and packed away for another year, the beds stripped and the cocktail shaker back in the cupboard – for a while at least. About that – I’ve discovered a great online community, Hello Sunday Morning, which has become the largest online movement for alcohol behaviour change in the world. There is a great app Daybreak, which offers professional support and tools together with an online community supporting each other.

I’m feeling a bit flat, to be honest, but have lots of things to look forward to this year, none more so than our 30th wedding anniversary in June – I know, right! Where have the years gone? We will be celebrating by taking a short break in Hong Kong later in the year. I’m pleased to say that we have survived what is being dubbed as Divorce Day, January 8th, the most popular day for couples to commence legal divorce proceedings, according to lawyers (a UK study). After the pressures of trying to achieve the perfect ‘chocolate box’ Christmas, it’s enough to send any rocky marriage over the edge. They wait for the kids to go back to school and then – bang!

Dad update: By the time you read this, my dad will have had a pacemaker fitted which is the result of all the shenanigans in Dubai way back in October. Hopefully, that will be it and a return to full fitness is on the cards. All the best for a full recovery Dad x.

So that’s my round up for the start of the new year as I start to plan my trip to the UK in April, I’ll leave you with some images of our time over Christmas – happy new year everyone and may your 2019 be one full of good health, happiness and laughter – you have to laugh every day!

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Wombat Update

Wombat Update

Several of you have inquired how my Dad is doing after his unscheduled stop in Dubai.  In case you’ve missed the news, Mum and Dad were flying home from Australia and Dad was taken ill on the flight, and rather than just the two-hour stopover expected, they ended up staying for three weeks. Paramedics were on the plane before the Captain had applied the handbrake, and following preliminary tests, Dad was taken to the medical centre at Dubai airport.

Plane

Extensive tests revealed a ‘problem’ heartbeat, and for a time it was looking like a pacemaker would be required.  Instead, Dad was fitted with a total of three stents and following a period of recuperation in a hotel, was given the all clear to continue the journey home to England – exactly three weeks later.

We have all learned something from this experience and in no particular order:

  • Travel insurance is a very good thing.
  • Dubai is a great place to be taken ill.
  • That Filipino health care professionals don’t stop smiling and treated ‘Mr. Richard’ like one of the family.
  • Skype is not permitted in the UAE; thank heavens for WhatsApp.
  • None of us should be flying for longer than 8 hours before having a break (at least one overnight stop).
  • If anyone questions why you are spending so much money on flying business class and decide to travel ‘cattle class’ – totally ignore them, especially if it’s your daughter.
  • Most importantly learn to do EVERYTHING, so when your ‘rock’  isn’t with you, and you have to deal with life’s unexpected challenges, you’ve got this.
  • When you really have to step up to the plate and take over the reins you (or Mum) can actually surprise yourself and do it
  • My Mum doesn’t know this but she is totally one of life’s true Amazon Warriors.

So that’s it, some lessons learned and some takeaways for us all. And Dad?  He’s gaining fitness and pleased to be home even if he does have a mountain of insurance papers to sift through – let Mum do them!

What about you, have you experienced an unexpected travel stop?

Good Morning Mr Magpie

One of the first cyclist I encountered in Adelaide had zip-ties attached to their helmet, making them look like……, I don’t know – silly I guess. Over the course of time, I noticed several cyclist with the same spikey adornments. I was going to have to investigate!  It turns out that they are a protection against swooping magpies.

Swooping MagpieDuring nesting season, the male magpie is naturally protective of his offspring and will turn aggressive if he thinks they are in danger from anyone or any thing, including people cycling by and walking through his patch.

When we moved to Brisbane, I noticed cyclist using heavy duty zip-ties; was there a species of magpie I didn’t know about up here? Some cyclist had eyes stuck to the helmet to fool the magpies into thinking they were being watched back.

I naively assumed that cyclist were way more at risk of being attacked than someone on foot – so imagine my surprise when it happened to me.

I was wandering around the neighbourhood a couple of Sundays ago with my camera and macro lens. I had stopped by the local sports field and was taking particular notice of the detail in the bark of a eucalyptus tree, when all of a sudden something grabbed the top of my left ear. My immediate reaction was to flap my arms about, wondering what on earth had just happened. As I turned around to see what it was, I realised it was a magpie and he was coming back for another go.  I flapped around like a woman possessed  which made the magpie even flappier! I ran as fast as my legs would take me until I was out of his territory. By this time my ear was throbbing and I realised that blood had been drawn – two puncture wounds.

The advice to protect yourself from possible attack is to wear a wide-brimmed hat or carry an umbrella. I was wearing a baseball cap so the tops of my little ears were sticking up and easy bait for the upset maggie. The other advice is don’t run and certainly don’t flap around like a woman possessed.  I did both.

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Australian Magpie

At work on Monday morning, I was reciting my experience to the gathered crowd and was expecting sympathy (yes, really!) when instead I’ve been welcomed into the ‘you are almost a true Aussie club’. Apparently I’m half way there and all that remains is for me to hit a kangaroo whilst driving  and I’m in!

Keep safe people – just remember to look out for the Drop Bears too!

Wombat’s Vacation

It’s been a while since you’ve heard from me; I’ve had visitors and trips away and life was busy for a time.

I met my parents in Adelaide, who were there to catch up with their grandchildren.  We spent a few days at Deep Creek Conservation Park on the Fleurieu Peninsula which lies a couple of hours south of Adelaide. The park is the largest remaining block of wildlife habitat on the Fleurieu Peninsula and is home to an array of native wildlife. Immerse yourself in nature says the guide. We certainly did; our accommodation was set in four acres of peaceful natural bushland. Kangaroos came up to the house, feeding out of the birdseed dish every afternoon. Honeyeaters, blackbirds and galas splashed about in the birdbath and the little Fairywren busily darted from one plant to another – it was bliss!

Seven of us had made the trip to Deep Creek as well as Ziggy and Polly,  two Kelpie/border collies – they had great fun trying to outrun the kangaroos (they stood no chance) and playing with Freyer, the whippet on the next door property. From the property we hiked down the cliff path to Blowhole Beach. The view across Backstairs Passage to Kangaroo Island was stunning with blue shimmering sea and azure blue skies; one of those ‘life is good’ moments.

Once the youngsters and dogs had departed for civilisation and the internet, the three ‘grown ups’ were left to soak up the peace and the away-from-it-all vibes; life’s stresses washed away and it really was a moment to recharge the batteries. One of our walks was through Stringybark Forest. The trees were magnificent. Because we were relatively late in the day doing the walk, the majority of birds had flown off for the day – we just had to look a little harder for the wildlife.

I brought Mum and Dad back to Brisbane with me to spend some time with us before their flight back to the UK. In the meantime, Chief and I attended our son’s engagement party in Adelaide. We had a super weekend and the weather gods were shining on the outdoor party while at the same time, Mum and Dad were experiencing torrential rain back in Brisbane. As you can see, we’ve been here, there and everywhere.

And now life has made a cruel twist – Dad was taken ill on their flight from Brisbane to Dubai last Wednesday and has been in a Dubai hospital undergoing extensive tests ever since. A ‘problem’ heartbeat has been detected and he may have to be fitted with a pacemaker before being given the all clear to carry on with their journey home. The Dubai health care is second to none thankfully, and we hope it won’t be too much longer before he is granted permission to travel home.

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A moment of dry by the Story Bridge, Brisbane

So as you can see, it’s all been a hectic time and this week Chief is preparing for a three-week work trip, leaving Thursday morning. I’ll be in touch soon – until then!

 

Square in September – Day 22

There is one more week left of BeckyB’s Square in September challenge with the theme In The Pink. The only rule is that your photograph has to be square. Give it a go!

I love playing with my camera especially with a macro lens.  It’s all about experimenting and having some fun. I just so happened to have a shot of the buds gradually opening up on this pink flower. It’s not perfect by any means but I was quite happy with it for a beginner.

Pink Square

#InThePink

Square in September – Day 17

Today is our son’s 25th birthday and apart from it making me feel rather old, I do believe that I have managed to capture all three elements for the ultimate ‘In The Pink’ challenge in this one photo.

tom and Christie
Tickled Pink

Earlier this year our son Thomas proposed to his beautiful girlfriend Christie. Chief and I were so delighted to be with them at the time, having flown to Adelaide for the weekend.

This photo shows Thomas wearing a pink shirt (tick!) The pair of them are absolutely tickled being having only been engaged for a few hours (tick!) and that ring is positively in the pink (tick!) Happy birthday Tom! xx

#InThePink 

 

 

Square in September – Day 14

Brisbane’s South Bank precinct includes 17 hectares of inner-city parkland with bars, restaurants, museums and a large beach and pool area. It stretches along the bank of the Brisbane river and is a cracking spot to spend some leisure time.

There is a 1km walkway shaded by a galvanised steel arbour which is covered in bougainvillea along its entire length.

Here you can just glimpse the Wheel of Brisbane through it.

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#InThePink